ACTION TV ONLINE EPISODE GUIDE
EPISODE GUIDE INDEX
Kipling
The Indian Stories Of Rudyard Kipling
BBC 1964
A Bank Fraud
TX : 5th July 1964
Director : Shaun Sutton
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Ralph Michael (Reggie Burke), Alfred Burke (Naboth), Murray Melvin (Silas Riley), Jameson Clark, Rene Setan, Carmel McSharry, Peter Diamond, Fred Hagerty, Colin Goldring, Stewart Golding, Heather Emmanuel, Alec Bregonzi and Lockwood West.

Publicity : The Indian Stories Of Rudyard Kipling - Some of the great storyteller's best-known works have been dramatized for television in a series beginning tonight:

In the anti-military, anti-imperialist era which succeeded the first world war one name above all others was guaranteed to make tweedy intellectuals turn as scarlet as their ties and that was Rudyard Kipling. He was the arch-jingoist, the arch-bootlicker, the arch-racist, the arch-reactionary - in fact the actual man and writer was all but obliterated by the labels plastered all over him. Many of these assiduous label-stickers would admit under pressure that they had never read any Kipling at all, apart perhaps from If; others when concerned would concede reluctantly that he was highly readable - "and that's what makes him so corrupting, don't you see!". In the 1950s the first signs of a critical reappraisal were seen. Now, one year before the centenary of Kipling's birth, a sizeable stream of books written with the object of restoring him to his proper place in English letters is beginning to appear.

Most critics now accept that Kipling was not the apologist of British rule in India, but simply its chronicler; and that when he wrote about the Army he was not merely glorifying military strength but trying to get a fair deal for his beloved Tommy Atkins. None the less the popular image of Kipling the flag-wagger dies hard, and the series which starts tonight hopes to prove among other things that he was not a propagandist but a consummate storyteller. All the stories which are now to be re-told in television terms date from the 1880s when Kipling was the very young assistant editor of the daily Civil and Military Gazette published in Lahore. The earliest of them appeared in that paper when Kipling was only nineteen, and most were written to a tight one-thousand-two-hundred-word limit imposed by considerations of make-up. Because of the shortness of the stories producer David Goddard decided that the best thing to do was to weave two of them together for each television episode. He also decided that there should be two main characters who would appear each week - William Stevens (Joss Ackland), a newspaper editor, and James Lockwood (Kenneth Fortescue), his young assistant.

The paper is not the Civil and Military, but it has elements of it. In the same way neither Stevens nor Lockwood is Kipling, but each personifies an aspect of him. Besides these two, several other regular characters will crop up from time to time: Inspector Strickland, the brilliant policeman who can merge perfectly into any corner of the Indian scene; Mrs Hauksbee, most elegant and forceful of all the memsahibs, with her friend Mrs Mallowe; and Mulvaney, Ortheris, and Learoyd, the Soldiers Three. Tonight's opening episode, "A Bank Fraud", has been adapted by John Maynard and is directed by Shaun Sutton. In it Stevens and Lockwood become involved in two intertwined stories: the rise and fall of Naboth, an Indian sweet-seller; and the short life of Riley the young Yorkshireman who works in the local bank. (Radio Times, July 2, 1964 - Article by Michael Williams).


Notes :
The series was originally transmitted 9:20pm to 10:10pm on BBC 1.


On The City Wall
TX : 12th July 1964
Director :
Waris Hussein
Script : Anthony Read

Cast : Zia Mohyeddin (Wali Dad), Valerie Samuf (Lalun), Michael Bates (Khem Singh), Nicholas Pennell, Michael Bangerter, Clifford Parrish, Basil Henson, Peter Lawrence, Harvey Hall and Kusum Thakur.

Publicity : On The City Wall - The Second Play In The Kipling Series: Quite apart from the merits of the plots - which are considerable - Rudyard Kipling's Indian stories score most heavily on their ability to evoke the total atmosphere of India - the smells and sounds of the bazaars and the restless, chattering Indian crows on the one hand, and the enclosed little world of the European community on the other. To recreate this atmosphere in a television play is perhaps the hardest problem of all; but in the case of tonight's production the problem is eased by the fact that two of the people principally concerned have a personal intimacy with the region in which the story takes place.

Like many other Kipling stories, "On The City Wall" is set in Lahore, a city in what is now Pakistan, and which was once the home of Zia Mohyeddin, the brilliant young Pakistani actor who is tonight's guest star. Moreover, as an undergraduate at the University of the Punjab, Mohyeddin worked part-time as sports reporter for the Civil and Military Gazette on which Kipling himself once worked. Waris Hussein, who directs the episode, is equally at home in the Lahore setting. Although he was educated in England and gained early professional experience at the Oxford Playhouse, he spent much of his childhood not far from Lahore. A comparatively new recruit to BBC Television, he has been working on the Doctor Who series.

The story of "On The City Wall" points up vividly the two co-existent worlds of nineteenth-century India. The British rulers, military and civilian, are concerned with the "official" politcs of maintaining the Raj, and with such family problems as the wild behvaiour of a newly-arrived subaltern. But other decisions are being made, other policies hammered out in a setting very different from Government House - the "salon" ruled by Lalun, a lovely courtesan. Wali Dad, the Westernised young Muslin played by Zia Mohyeddin, has a foot in both camps; and in trying to emulate him, young Lockwood, the assistant editor of the local newspaper, finds himself drawn into a pattern of intrigue and violence. (Radio Times, July 9, 1964).


Notes :
John Robins was also producing the popular BBC crime series Thorndyke, which was transmitted on Saturday evenings prior to Kipling's Sunday transmissions.

The Return To Imray
TX : 19th July 1964
Director :
Graham Evans
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Bruno Barnabe (Bahadur Khan), David Jaxon, Corinne de Sazilly, Ashley Ludwick, Henri Pallette, Howard Goorney, David Lander, Hari Khayam, Isha Bux, Mary Gill, Ann Singh, Kumar Ranji, Frank Cranshaw and Peter Eyre.

Publicity : Kipling - The Return Of Imray: The Englishmen who served the Queen-Empress in the India of Rudyard Kipling's day were in no way a special breed: they formed as representative a group of Victorians as any to be found at home. Consequently, they included in their ranks the obtuse as well as the subtle. It was in their individual treatment of the "natives" that their differences emerged most strongly. At one extreme there were the men to whom all Indians, regardless of race, religion or caste, were the same - "niggers" to be abused, or at best refractory children to be scolded. But to the lasting credit of the Raj there were at the other extreme men like Inspector Strickland. For this very experienced and wise policeman the "white man's burden" was a real and precious trust which could only be properly fulfilled by unremitting study of, and sympathy for, the peoples he helped to rule.

Tonight's episode, adapted by John Maynard, is called "The Return Of Imray" and it sees young Lockwood the journalist learning some valuable lessons from this master. It is set in one of the all-too-frequent periods of famine, and once again it combines two stories - that of the orphan Tobrah Din and his love for his blind sister, and that of the mysterious disappearance if Imray Sahib, the civil servant from the Government Office. Inspector Strickland is played by Barry Letts, an actor who has devoted most of the last ten years to television. To BBC Television viewers he is already familiar as another kind of policeman - Chief Inspector Rogers of Z-Cars. He was also to be seen as a French Resistance leader in an episode of Moonstrike. (Radio Times, July 16, 1964).


Private Learoyd's Story
TX : 26th July 1964
Director : Peter Cregeen
Script : Anthony Read

Cast : Douglas Livingstone (Private Learoyd), Harry Landis (Private Ortheris), David Burke (Private Mulvaney), Peggy Thorpe-Bates (Mrs Richmond), David Hemmings (Dickie Hatt), Dandy Nichols (Mrs DeSussa), Tony Caunter, Dennis Adams, John Gabriel, Kenneth Keeling, David MacMillan, Barry Shawzin, Amy Dalby and "Peeler" Franklyn.

Publicity : The three soldiers, Private Stanley Ortheris, Jock Learoyd and Terence Mulvaney are bibulous musketeers who are among Kipling's best-known characters - and tonight they are mustered on parade for the first time in this series. Respectively a wiry little Cockney, a slow-spoken Yorkshireman and a silver-tongued Irishman, they obviously enjoy the deep affection of their creator. They are boozers, scroungers and liars; in essentials, they differ very little from their counterparts of a century earlier, the redcoats whom Wellington described amiably as "the scum of Europe" who "only joined for drink". Kipling was among the few members of his class who believed that these men and their kind deserved better than they got. He knew that if they drank nit was as a relief from the soulless discipline under which they lived, if they stole it was because their pay was derisory, and that they lied because it was expected of them. And they held India safe for people with nicer habits while dying singly from jezail bullets and by companies from cholera.

Tonight's episode in the Kipling series is called simple "Private Learoyd's Story", and it relates a typical joint operation by the Soldiers Three. Pay-day is distant, throats are dry, and there is a Eurasian lady prepared to pay a fistful of rupees for a dog she covets. The trouble is the dog in question belongs to the colonel's lady. In the adaptation by Anthony Read, this story is coupled with the account of an overworked young English clerk with a serious problem. (Radio Times, July 23, 1964).


A Germ Destroyer
TX : 2nd August 1964
Director : Shaun Sutton
Script : A R Rawlinson

Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), Cyril Luckham (The Viceroy), James Villiers (Wander), Graham Crowden (Mellish), Barrie Ingham (Otis Yeere), Frank Littlewood, Philip Stone, Desmond Llewellyn (The Member Of Council), Alec Bregonzi, John Kelland and Zohra Segal.

The Tomb Of His Ancestors
TX : 9th August 1964
Director : Herbert Wise
Script : A R Rawlinson

Cast : Ian McKellen, Peter Madden (Bukta), Kevin Stoney (The Colonel), Geoffrey Alexander, Robin Phillips (John Chinn), Michael Sirr, Bernard Brown, Ishaq Bux and David Graham.

Publicity : Kipling - The Tomb Of His Ancestors: For many British families, service in India was a sacred and continuing tradition which was carried on from generation to generation. Members of such "old Indian" families inevitably tended to attract a special respect from their native subordinates - while at the same time a great deal was of course expected of them. John Chinn, the central character in The Tomb Of His Ancestors, is the latest heir to just such a tradition. His grandfather had been a famous administrator in the days of John Company, a man who had given over his whole life to improving the lot of the remote and primitive Bhil people. In consequence, the Bhils still worship him as a God and place offerings on his grave in the jungle. Young John has just arrived from England, a newly-commissioned subaltern, and it so happens that his arrival coincides with the threat of a disturbance among the Bhils.

He applies for leave to go on shikar after tiger, deep into the country where his grandfather's people live; and Indians and Englishman alike watch anxiously to see how he measures up to the situation and to his special responsibilities as a Chinn. Observing from the side-lines is young Lockwood, who hopes to enjoy his first taste of tiger hunting, while more intimately involved is the unfortunate Hindu medical assistant who has been charged with the thankless task of bringing the blessings of modern prophylaxis to the Bhils. Young Chinn is played by Robin Phillips, with Peter Madden as Bukta. (Radio Times, August 6, 1964).


Notes : Kipling marked the first television appearance of Sir Ian McKellen in the episode The Tomb Of His Ancestors.

Mark Of The Beast
TX : 16th August 1964
Director : Waris Hussein
Script : John Maynard


Cast : Michael Bates (The Admi), George Pastell (Khan), Jameson Clark (Doctor Dumoise), Zienia Merton, John Law, Noel Davis, Prem Bakshi and Salmaan Peer.

Publicity :
Kipling - Mark Of The Beast: One of the many aspects of India's culture which baffled the country's nineteenth-century British overlords was the proliferation of religions and sects. Broadly speaking, there were the Moslems and the Hindus, then, as now, not always the best of friends, but in addition each individual deity within the Hindu pantheon also attracted his fiercely devoted cult of worshippers. Official policy was to leave local religions strictly alone, and some of the sahibs were content to lump them together as "a lot of mumbo-jumbo" and leave it at that. Others were more respectful, or at least more curious. Inspector Strickland for one felt it was less than prudent to dismiss the power of Asia's gods, while the young journalist Lockwood was inevitably determined to find out all he could about them.

Mark Of The Beast, tonight's Kipling story, recounts what happens when Lockwood tries to satisfy this curiosity. It is New Year's Eve in Lahore, there is a party on at the club, and on this "pagan" occasion the conversation turns to religions. Lockwood, who has just emerged successfully from an encounter with an Indian nobleman who was trying to bribe him, is feeling particularly confident of his ability to fathom the "native" mind. Furthermore, he is rather drunk. So when someone mentions the existence of a temple nearby dedicated to Hanuman the Monkey God, he feels impelled to investigate, with consequences which call for some agonizing efforts on the part of his editor Mr Stevens and Inspector Strickland. (Radio Times, August 13, 1964).


Three - And An Extra
TX : 23rd August 1964
Director : Peter Cregeen
Script : John Maynard


Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), Jean Kent (Mrs Threegan), Keith Barron (Captain Gadsby), Penelope Homer (Mrs Cusack-Bremmil), John Bonney (Mr Cusack-Bremmil), Carole Lorimer, Anna Palk, David David, Hissar Hussein and Tom Macaulay.

Publicity : Kipling - Mark Of The Beast: One of the many aspects of India's culture which baffled the country's nineteenth-century British overlords was the proliferation of religions and sects. Broadly speaking, there were the Moslems and the Hindus, then, as now, not always the best of friends, but in addition each individual deity within the Hindu pantheon also attracted his fiercely devoted cult of worshippers. Official policy was to leave local religions strictly alone, and some of the sahibs were content to lump them together as "a lot of mumbo-jumbo" and leave it at that. Others were more respectful, or at least more curious. Inspector Strickland for one felt it was less than prudent to dismiss the power of Asia's gods, while the young journalist Lockwood was inevitably determined to find out all he could about them.

Mark Of The Beast, tonight's Kipling story, recounts what happens when Lockwood tries to satisfy this curiosity. It is New Year's Eve in Lahore, there is a party on at the club, and on this "pagan" occasion the conversation turns to religions. Lockwood, who has just emerged successfully from an encounter with an Indian nobleman who was trying to bribe him, is feeling particularly confident of his ability to fathom the "native" mind. Furthermore, he is rather drunk. So when someone mentions the existence of a temple nearby dedicated to Hanuman the Monkey God, he feels impelled to investigate, with consequences which call for some agonizing efforts on the part of his editor Mr Stevens and Inspector Strickland. (Radio Times, August 13, 1964).


The Madness Of Private Ortheris
TX : 30th August 1964
Director : Shaun Sutton
Script : A R Rawlinson

Cast : Harry Landis (Private Ortheris), David Burke (Private Mulvaney), Douglas Livingstone (Private Learoyd), Brian Oulton (Lord Trig), John Paul (Colonel Richmond), Peggy Thorpe-Bates (Mrs Richmond) and Jack Rodney (Bhuldoo).


The Sending Of Dana Da
TX : 6th September 1964
Director : Waris Hussein
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Jameson Clark (Doctor Dumoise), Jean Kent (Mrs Threegan), Warren Mitchell (Dana Da), John Moffatt (Mr Lone), Rosemary Martin (Miss Roberts), Nyree Dawn Porter (Janoo), Bobby Naidoo, Johnny Clayton, Jeremy Wilkins, Michael Burrell, Kate Binchy, Usha Jones, Donald Eccles and Jeffrey Isaacs.

Publicity : Table-rapping … strange revelations … psychic forces. The Victorians, or many of them at least, were all too ready to swallow this kind of thing even when at home in their palm-decked London drawing-rooms. But when they found themselves in the Mysterious East, where such marvels were supposedly part of the very fabric of life, they could really let themselves go. Tonight's Kipling story adapted by John Maynard tells of Simla Creed, a typical manifestation of the European fashion for the spooky. Stevens has fallen foul of the sect, and he is persuaded by a wandering sorcerer named Dana Da to cooperate in a "sending" - the visitation of a strange affliction on one of the sect's leading members. At the same time, strange forces are at work among the Indian population. Suddhoo, owner of a "pleasure home" in Lahore, has a son lying suck in a distant town. He too has found a sorcerer who is prepared to give information on the patient's condition … (Radio Times, September 3, 1964).

Only A Subaltern
TX : 13th September 1964
Director : Donald McWhinnie
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), Maureen Pryor (Mrs Schreiderling), Ronald Lacey (Private Dormer), Anthony Roye (Colonel Schreiderling), Gary Bond (Lieutenant Bobby Wick), Philip Grout, John Martin, David Battley, Tony Selby (Private Robinson), George Waring, Carmel McSharry, Dean Francis, Rolf Lefebvre, Alex Farrell, Jon Laurimore, Murray Llewellyn, Hal Jeaves, Chiks Barucha and A P Jesudasen.


Black Jack
TX : 20th September 1964
Director : Peter Cregeen
Script : Pat Dunlop

Cast : David Burke (Private Mulvaney), Harry Landis (Private Ortheris), Douglas Livingstone (Private Learoyd), Nigel Green (Sergeant O'Hara), Patriock O'Connell, Denys Graham, Donald Bisset, Geoffrey Lumsden, John Dawson, Edward Kelsey, Ivor Salter, James Caffrey, Paddy Joyce, Barbara Kennedy and Wesley Murphy.

Publicity : The British like to congratulate themselves rather smugly on their phlegmatic nature. The vendetta, the smoudlering jealousy which erupts into the crime of passion, are things which belong exclusively to the southern and eastern peoples; Britons are protected by their sang froid. So they may. But Kipking knew better; he knew that in a hot climate an Englishman can become as hot-blooded as any Sicilian. In fact, as Stevens' foreman Rukn Din remarks sadly, "sun is bad for sahibs". Black Jack is adapted by Pat Dunlop and as it opens the scene is set for violent tragedy. The hot season is at its height, the stuffy cantonments at Lahore are no more bearable by night than by day. At the other ranks' married quarters, the lecherous Corporal Mackie is bidding an impassioned farewell to Dolly, the ruthless wife of Sergeant Raines. On the verandah, the regimental Chisti seems to be asleep, but watches the embrace with one bright eye. A little further away, Mulvaney, Ortheris and Learoyd are also taking in the situation. There is one other witness: Sergeant Raines himself, and he is carrying his new Martini rifle … (Radio Times, September 17, 1964).


The Rescue Of Pluffles
TX : 27th September 1964
Director : Max Varnel
Script : Rosemary Anne Sisson

Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), Jean Kent (Mrs Threegan), Vanda Godsell (Mrs Herriot), Keith Barron (Captain Gadsby), John Barcroft (Lieutenant Pluffles), Nicholas Pennell (Captain Martyn), Anna Palk, Carole Lorimer, Jack Lambert, Ray Browne, Zorah Segal, Florence Gilpin and Alastair Hunt.


Beyond The Pale
TX : 3rd October 1964
Director : Graham Evans
Script : Anthony Read

Cast : Tim Seely (Saumarez), Jemma Hyde (Maud Copleigh), Suzanne Neve (Kitty Youghal), David MacMillan, Usha Joshi, Anna Tirard, Carole Nimmons, Prem Bakshi and Fiona Hartford.


Watches Of The Night
TX : 10th October 1964
Director : Ian Curteis
Script : William Emms

Cast : David Burke (Private Mulvaney), Douglas Livingstone (Private Learoyd), Harry Landis (Private Ortheris), Jane Asher (Cynthia), Ruth Kettlewell (Mrs Eldridge), Alan MacNaughton (Major Eldridge), Vanessa Forsyth, Keneth Thornett, Nicholas Courtney (Captain Notley), Danvers Walker, Joan MacDonald, Patsy Smart, Christopher Carlos, Prem Bakshi, Gerry Duggan, Muguette de Braie and Robert Fyfe.


Publicity : The protection of delicate, female lambs from commissioned wolves is the task of Mulvaney in tonight's episode. While helping backstage in garrison amateur theatricals he discovers that a rather disreputable captain is inveigling the charming young daughter of the company commander into an elopement. Mulvaney decides that finesse must be met with finesse and devises an ingenious plan to frustrate the scheming officer. His campaign in defence of the girl's honour involves the loan of a cart and a watch, much coming and going between the theatre and the company commander's house, a constant and exact attention to time, and, ultimately, the impersonation of a native driver. (Radio Times, October 8, 1964).

Miss Youhal's Sais
TX : 17th October 1964
Director : Harold Clayton
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), George Woodbridge (Commissioner Barr-Saggott), Suzannne Neve (Kitty Youghal), Peter Bathurst (General Fitzadam), Nita Moyce (Mrs Youghal), Prem Bakshi, Ronald Swire, Ernest Hare, Rene Setan, Anar Nathoo, Stanley Walsh, Edwin Brown and Nisar Hussein.


The Head Of The District
TX : 24th October 1964
Director : Terence Dudley
Script : Harry Green

Cast : Zia Mohyeddin (Grish Chunder De), Victor Lucas (Khoda Dad Khan), Michael Sheard, Mark Moss, Lloyd Lamble, Robert Gillespie (Michael D'Cruze), Peter Kirss, David Rose, Donald Hoath, Nicholas Brent, Michael Bird, Leslie Glazer, Alan Heider, Peter Honeywell and Prem Bakshi.

Publicity :
Throughout India's restless history, her multitude of peoples have usually opposed each other even more vigorously than they have opposed outside conquerors. It was, and is, anything but a land of brothers. That was one of the great problems of the Raj: when it came to promoting Indians to positions of authority, they could only be put to work with safety among their own people. Elsewhere, they were infinitely more alien than the British. The Head Of The District tells of an attempt by a somewhat visionary Viceroy to change this situation. Yardleigh-Orde, for long the strong, respected head of a remote district, dies of fever. And to replace him the forward-looking government appoints Mr Grish Chunder De. But, unfortunately, to the proud Khusru Kheyl hillmen of the Kot-Khumarsen district, this gentleman is not a distinguished Oxford graduate and administrator, but simply "a Black Bengalo". Trouble is inevitable, and on the spot to report it is the young journalist James Lockwood. (Radio Times, October 22, 1964).


Love 'o Women
TX : 1st November 1964
Director : Max Varnel
Script : William Emms

Cast : Douglas Livingstone (Private Learoyd), Harry Landis (Private Ortheris), David Burke (Private Mulvaney), John Paul (Colonel Richmond), Peggy Thorpe-Bates (Mrs Richmond), Kenneth Farrington (Private Tighe), Toni Gilpin (Sylvia), Prem Bakshi and Desmond Davies.


Consequences
TX : 15th November 1964
Director : Shaun Sutton
Script : Shaun Sutton

Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), Barry Foster (Richard Tarrion), John Welsh (Sir Edward Lidyard), Gordon Gostelow (General Prendergast), John Kidd, Neil Stacy, Renu Setna, Zohra Segal, Clive Russell, Jeremy Young and Robert Perceval.

Publicity :
Barbara Murray As Mrs Hauksbee In Tonight's Kipling Story - Consequences: At the centre of a wonderfully intricate web of intrigue in tonight's Kipling story is that uncrowned queen of Simla society, the ever-busy, widely loved and widely hated Mrs Hauksbee. The story, dramatized and directed by Shaun Sutton, recounts how Mrs Hauksbee employs her formidable talents to advance the career of a young man commended to her by the journalist Lockwood. In so doing, she aims also to damage the career of a senior official who has been foolhardy enough to attack her openly. Mrs Hauksbee is undoubtedly one of Kipling's most alarming characters; but in her desperate attempts to control affairs while warding off old age she is also pathetic. And in the view of Barbara Murray, the actress who plays her, she must not be condemned as just a spiteful woman who intrigues purely for her own perverse pleasure. "Lucy Hauksbee is an extremely able woman," says Miss Murray. "had she been born into the twentieth century, she would quite certainly have become a very successful career woman; but she is faced with a society in which the instruments of power are kept firmly in the hands of men. So she is forced to work through men - most of whom are far less intelligent than herself - to achieve ends which are usually quite desirable".

Unlike the character she portrays Miss Murray has been able to pursue a successful career since the age of seventeen, when she was put under contract by the Rank Organisation. As one of the select group of "starlets" she appeared during the next few years in a great number of films, most of which she describes as "utterly unnoticeable". Some however, like Passport To Pimlico, were rather more memorable. Equally unlike Mrs Hauksbee, Miss Murray does not despise domesticity, and in fact she handed in her Rank contract after six years to marry and raise a family of three. Subsequently she resumed her career, appearing in the film Doctor In Distress, and for BBC Television in the science-fiction serial The Escape Of RD7. But she still likes domestic pursuits and is an enthusiastic cook "now that my children are all past the baby-food stage". Outside the home, she likes simply to go for walks, in the New Forest for preference; and that, one feels, is a very un-Hauksbee-like thing to do. (Radio Times, November 12, 1964).


His Private Honor
TX : 22nd November 1964
Director : Lionel Harris
Script : William Emms

Cast : Douglas Livingstone (Private Learoyd), Harry Landis (Private Ortheris), David Burke (Private Mulvaney), Terence Edmond (Lieutenant Ouless), Basil Henson (Colonel Brander), Derrick Sherwin, Michael Standing, Stephen Abley, Terence J Donovan, Alister Williamson, Stanley Lloyd and Kenneth Fortescue.

Publicity :
A raw young officer joining the Indian Army faced several difficulties. He encountered some of the toughest officers and men in the British forces; he was thrown into a complex colonial and military situation, and often his own innocence of Army life was treated peremptorily by his superiors. When the callow Lieutenant Ouless arrives with a company which is as raw as he is, an abrupt awakening is in store for him. He finds himself at loggerheads with Colonel Brader, a disciplinarian, and to complicate matters further Stevens is keeping a fatherly eye on him. (Radio Times, November 19, 1964).


Without Benefit Of Clergy
TX : 29th November 1964
Director : Waris Hussein
Script : K Levison and John Robins

Cast : Ruth Dunning (Mrs Stratton), William Mervyn (Mr Stratton), Meg Wynn Owen (Gwen Stratton), Philip Bond (Holden), Yolande Bavan (Ameera) Zohra Segal and Ishaq Bux.

Publicity :
Kipling - Without Benefit Of Clergy: When the first Englishmen came to India to "shake the golden-leaved pagoda tree" - to make their fortunes - they had no compunction whatsoever about "going native". They wore Indian dress, ate Indian food, and married Indian women - sometimes permanently. But by Kipling's time segregation was officially established and with it Victorian hypocrisy. So although the large proportion of unattached males among the occupiers made irregular unions inevitable and commonplace, these officially did not exist. In tonight's story, Without Benefit Of Clergy, Kipling tells of the women in the life of one John Holden (Philip Bond), a young civil official. Among his own people there is Gwen Stratton, daughter of a "pukka memsahib" whose little life is governed by calling-cards and problems of precedence; Gwen would a "suitable" wife for him. But there is also Ameera (Yolande Bavan), the delicate Moslem beauty who calls Holden "Lord" and means it, and asks only the privilege of serving him submissively. Kipling is in fact restating his often misunderstood dictum about "East is East and West is West" to show, not that the twain could not meet, but that the consequences of such a meeting could sometimes be tragic. Young Lockwood comes into the story as a not-too-favoured rival for Miss Stratton's attentions, and he and his hard-bitten editor again share the role that was Kipling's own - the perceptive observer of an artificial society. (Radio Times, November 26, 1964).


The Bronckhorst Divorce Case
TX : 6th December 1964
Director : Sheelagh Rees
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Margaret Tyzack (Mrs Bronckhurst), Patrick Troughton (Mr Bronckhurst), Madhav Sharma, Robert Cook, Sorava Rafat, Dean Francis, Prem Bakshi, Gordon Whiting and Dudley Harrison.


A Second-Rate Woman
TX : 13th December 1964
Director : Gareth Davies
Script : Rosemary Anne Sisson

Cast : Barbara Murray (Mrs Hauksbee), Georgina Cookson (Mrs Mallowe), Mary Miller (Mrs Denville), Peter Ashmore (Mr Bent), John Abineri, Alethea Charlton, Patricia Lawrence and Richard Burrell.

Publicity :
Since British women in India cannot be useful they must be ornamental, says the formidable Mrs Hauksbee early in tonight's episode. This outburst is caused by the arrival of Mrs Delville in Simla. It is Mrs Delville's ability to attract men while disregarding the niceties of fashion which enrages Mrs Hauksbee. She can understand the interest of a bounder like Bent in such a woman but when Lockwood shows every sign of finding something attractive about Mrs Delville her sense of outrage becomes ungovernable. (Radio Times, December 10, 1964).


A Wayside Comedy
TX : 20th December 1964
Director : Peter Cregeen
Script : John Maynard

Cast : Ronald Hines (Captain Kurrell), Victor Maddern (Mr Boulte), Nancie Herrod, Geoffrey Chater and Zohra Segal.


The Man Who Was
TX : 27th December 1964
Director : John Cox
Script : A R Rawlinson

Cast : David Markham (Limmason), Ray Smith (Dirkovitch), Michael Gover (The Colonel), Martin Jarvis ("Little Mildred"), Edwin Apps, Stephen Saggers, Terence Sewards, Ron Welling, Alec Wallis, Richard Dennis, John Frawley, Norman Jones and Neville Becker.



Based on the anecdotes of Rudyard Kipling which he wrote for a Lahore daily during the 1880s, Kipling was a series of twenty-five fifty-minute plays which featured four principally recurring characters who weaved in and out of the individual storylines portrayed therein.


The Tomb Of His Ancestors


Newspaper editor William Stevens (Joss Ackland), young journalist James Lockwood (Kenneth Fortescue), Mian Rukn Din (Patrick Westwood) and Inspector Strickland (Barry Letts) figured prominently in terms of either recording the stories themselves, or took an active role in attending a social function or working behind the scenes whilst events were played out for the audience.


Mark Of The Beast

The series, based on material which was essentially a product of its time, whilst entertaining in terms of its novelty value, but failed to captivate the viewing public and is often disregarded amidst a plethora of similar programmes (Studio Four, Boy Meets Girl, Londoners, The Wednesday Play, etc).


On The City Wall

However, the series is notable for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that it marks Sir Ian McKellen's first appearance on British Television in The Tomb Of His Ancestors.


Consequences

Other creditable performances from the likes of Zia Mohyeddin, Alfred Burke, Barbara Murray, Keith Barron and Patrick Troughton also raises the calibre of this programme. Directors ranged from Shaun Sutton, Waris Hussein, Peter Cregeen and Terence Dudley, whilst the programme was produced by David Goddard and John Robins (the latter of which was also simultaneously producing Thorndyke for Saturday broadcasts).


Without Benefit Of Clergy

The series was never released commercially in any format.


Return Of Imray

Characters
Portrayed By
William Stevens
Joss Ackland
James Lockwood
Kenneth Fortescue
Mian Rukn Din
Patrick Westwood
Inspector Strickland
Barry Letts

The series was produced by David Goddard (Parts 1-16) and John Robins (Parts 17-25). Story Editors for the series were Anthony Read and John Gould.

Text © Matthew Lee, 2006.